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While there weren’t a great number of tax measures included in the 2018 Fall Economic Statement brought down by the Minister of Finance on November 21, 2018, the tax changes that were announced represented good news for Canadian businesses.


Most Canadians know that the deadline for making contributions to one’s registered retirement savings plan (RRSP) comes after the end of the calendar year, around the end of February. There are, however, some instances an RRSP contribution must be (or should be) made by December 31st, in order to achieve the desired tax result, as follows.


For individual Canadian taxpayers, the tax year ends at the same time as the calendar year. And what that means for individual Canadians is that any steps taken to reduce their tax payable for 2018 must be completed by December 31, 2018. (For individual taxpayers, the only significant exception to that rule is registered retirement savings plan contributions, which can be made any time up to and including March 1, 2019, and claimed on the return for 2018.)


The holiday season is usually costly, but few Canadians are aware that those costs can include increased income tax liability resulting from holiday gifts and celebrations. It doesn’t seem entirely in the spirit of the season to have to consider possible tax consequences when attending holiday celebrations and receiving gifts; however, our tax system extends its reach into most areas of the lives of Canadians, and the holidays are no exception. Fortunately, the possible negative tax consequences are confined to a minority of fact situations and relationships, usually involving employers and employees, and are entirely avoidable with a little advance planning.


Two quarterly newsletters have been added—one dealing with personal issues, and one dealing with corporate issues.


Getting a post-secondary education – or professional training – isn’t inexpensive. Tuition costs can range from as little as $5,000 per year for undergraduate studies to as much as $40,000 in tuition for a year of professional education. And those costs don’t factor in necessary expenditures on textbooks and other ancillary costs, to say nothing of general living expenses, like rent, transportation and food.


When the Canada Pension Plan was launched in the mid-1960s, both the working lives and the retirements of Canadians looked a lot different than they do in 2018. Fifty years ago, most Canadians were able to work at a single full-time job, often held that job for most or all of their working lives and, in many cases, benefitted from an employer sponsored defined benefit pension plan which guaranteed a certain level of income in retirement.


Most Canadians deal with our tax system only once a year, when preparing the annual tax return. And, while that return – the T1 Individual Income Tax Return – may be only four pages long, the information on those four pages is supported by 13 supplementary federal schedules, dealing with everything from the calculation of the tax-free gain on the sale of a principal residence to the determination of required Canada Pension Plan contributions by self-employed taxpayers.


Anyone who has ever tried to reduce their overall personal or household debt knows that doing so, no matter how disciplined one’s approach, can seem like a one step forward, two steps back proposition. It sometimes seems that, just as measurable progress is achieved in one area (an extra payment is made on the mortgage), unexpected costs in another area (a significant car repair bill) push up the level of debt elsewhere (e.g., credit card debt).


The forest fires affecting Northern Alberta and the Canada’s Revenue Agency’s (CRA’s) offer of administrative tax relief to those affected by the fires and the resulting evacuations has highlighted a federal government program of which few taxpayers are aware – the CRA’s Taxpayer Relief Program. In a nutshell, that program offers relief from interest charges, penalties, and collection actions for those who are unable, due to circumstances outside their control, from fulfilling their tax filing and/or payment obligations.


As the end of the school year draws closer, and with it the start of two months of summer holidays, families who don’t have a stay-at-home parent (and likely some who do) must start thinking about how to keep the kids supervised and busy throughout the summer months. There is no shortage of options — at this time of year, advertisements for summer activities and summer camps abound — but nearly all the available options have one thing in common, and that’s a price tag. Some choices, like day camps provided by the local recreation authority can be relatively inexpensive, while the cost of others, like summer-long residential camps or elite level sports or arts camps, can run to the thousands of dollars.


By May 23, 2016, the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) had processed just under 26 million individual income tax returns filed for the 2015 tax year. About half of those returns (56%) resulted in a refund to the taxpayer. About 18% of returns filed and processed required payment of a tax balance by the taxpayer. Slightly over 20% were what are called “nil” returns – returns where no tax is owing and no refund claimed, but the taxpayer is filing in order to provide income information which will be used to determine his or her eligibility for tax credit payments (like the Canada Child Tax Benefit or the HST credit ).


Canada’s tax system is a self-assessing and self-reporting one, in which taxpayers are expected (and required) to provide the tax authorities with an annual summary of their income and any deductions and tax credits claimable, along with payment of any tax amount owed. Although no one really likes doing their taxes, or paying those taxes, the vast majority of Canadians nonetheless do file their returns on time, and pay up. For a significant minority, however, completing and filing the return is something that just doesn’t get done. Sometimes the cause is just procrastination, while in other cases, a taxpayer is worried that there will be a large balance owing and he or she avoids completing and filing the return for that reason.


Springtime and early summer is moving season in Canada. The real estate market is traditionally at its strongest in the spring, and spring house sales are followed by real estate closings and moves in the following late spring and early summer months. All of this means that a great number of Canadians will be buying or selling houses this spring and summer and, inevitably, moving. Moving is a stressful and often expensive undertaking, even when the move is a desired one — buying a coveted (and increasingly difficult to obtain) first home, perhaps, or taking a step up the property ladder to a second, larger home. There is not much that can diminish the stress of moving, but the financial hit can be offset somewhat by a tax deduction which may be claimed for many of those moving-related costs.


By now, most Canadian taxpayers (excepting the self-employed and their spouses, who have until June 15) will have filed their 2015 income tax returns. Once the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) has processed those millions of returns, over the next few weeks and months, taxpayers across Canada will begin to receive Notices of Assessment for 2015. In most cases, the Notice of Assessment issued will simply confirm the information which the taxpayer provided on the return, perhaps with some minor arithmetical corrections. However, not infrequently, the Notice of Assessment will indicate that the CRA has disallowed or changed the amount of certain deductions or credits, or has included in income amounts not declared by the taxpayer on his or her return. When that happens, it’s time for the taxpayer to decide whether to dispute the CRA’s assessment of their tax situation.


In recent years, there has been a great deal of public discussion about the availability (and the viability) of federal income support programs for retirees. It’s not news that Canada’s population is aging, and the demands placed on government-sponsored retirement income programs will of course increase as greater numbers of Canadians reach the age at which they will be entitled to receive monthly benefit payments from those programs.


By the time most Canadians sit down to organize their various tax slips and receipts and undertake to complete their tax return for 2015, the most significant opportunities to minimize the tax bill for the year are no longer available. Most such tax planning or saving strategies, in order to be effective for 2015, must have been implemented by the end of the calendar year. The major exception to that is, of course, the making of registered retirement savings plan (RRSP) contributions, but even that had to be done on or before February 29, 2016 in order to be deducted on the return for 2015.


Over the next academic and calendar year, post-secondary students will find that a number of changes are taking place with respect to the rules governing the financing side of post-secondary education. Some of those changes will be welcome, and others will not.


For several decades, Canadian families have received financial assistance from the federal government to help offset the cost of raising children, through a range of benefits and allowance programs. Those programs have taken a variety of forms, from direct payments to parents to credits provided on the annual tax return. Some amounts provided under some such programs were taxable, while others were not. The one constant throughout those decades is that such programs are in a continual state of change and revision, resulting in a sometimes confusing patchwork of entitlements.


There’s no denying that the Canadian tax system is complex, even for individuals with relatively straightforward tax and financial circumstances. As well, significant costs can follow if a taxpayer gets it wrong when filing the annual tax return. Sometimes those costs are measured in the amount of time needed to straighten out the consequences of mistakes made on the annual return; in a worst case scenario, they can involve financial costs in the form of interest charges or even penalties levied for a failure to remit taxes payable on time or in the right amount. Whatever the reason, fewer and fewer individuals are willing to brave the annual trip through the 488 lines of the federal tax return (plus seemingly innumerable related federal schedules and provincial tax forms), and that means that the percentage of Canadians who have their return prepared by someone who has, presumably, more expertise, has continued to rise.


Any taxpayer told of a strategy that offered the possibility of saving hundreds or thousands of dollars in tax and increasing his or her eligibility for government benefits while requiring no advance planning, no expenditure of funds, and almost no expenditure of time could be forgiven for thinking that what was proposed was an illegal tax scam. In fact, that description applies to pension income splitting which is a government-sanctioned strategy to allow married taxpayers over the age of 65 (or, in some cases, age 60) to minimize their combined tax bill by dividing their private pension income in a way which creates the best possible tax result.


For several years, the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) has been seeking to convince Canadian taxpayers of the benefits of filing their annual tax return online, and it seems that their efforts have been successful. Last year, over 80% of Canadian taxpayers filed their returns by electronic means. The change has been a rapid one, as nearly 40% of tax filers filed a paper return in 2011, with that number dropping to less than 20% in 2015.


While filing a tax return is an annual event for just about every Canadian, the return that is filed, and sometimes the process of filing it, changes each year. Differences in the return itself arise from changes made in our tax laws, which occur on a regular basis. Changes to the filing process generally come about because of changes in the Canada Revenue Agency’s (CRA) administrative procedures, which themselves are usually the result of improvements in technology. The process of filing returns for 2015 includes both types of changes.


Two quarterly newsletters have been added—one dealing with personal issues, and one dealing with corporate issues.


The early months of the new calendar year can feel like a never-ending series of bills and other financial obligations. Credit card bills from holiday spending, or perhaps a mid-winter vacation, are due or coming due. The RRSP deadline of February 29, 2016 is approaching, and the May 2, 2016 deadline for payment of any final balance of 2015 income taxes owed is not far behind.


Millions of Canadians receive Old Age Security (OAS) benefits, meaning that millions of Canadians may be subject to the OAS “recovery tax” or, as it is more commonly referred to, the clawback. Unfortunately, very few Canadians are familiar with that tax or how it works, and even fewer incorporate the possibility of having to pay the tax into their retirement income planning. There are, however, strategies which allow taxpayers to minimize or avoid the OAS clawback in retirement.


Canadian taxpayers don’t need a calendar to know that the registered retirement savings plan (RRSP) contribution deadline is approaching — the glut of television, radio and internet ads which fill the airwaves and screens this time of year are reminder enough. And, while RRSP planning and retirement planning generally are best approached as an ongoing, year-round activity, it is true that an imminent deadline tends to focus the minds of taxpayers on such issues


As the time for the traditionally strong spring housing market approaches, the current state of Canadian real estate is on the minds of a lot of Canadians these days. It’s also a concern for Finance Canada, which has made a change to Canadian mortgage financing rules which will take effect on February 15, 2016, in time for that spring housing market.


The Employment Insurance premium rate for 2016 is 1.88%.

Yearly maximum insurable earnings are set at $50,800, making the maximum employee premium $955.04.

As in previous years, employer premiums are 1.4 times the employee contribution. The maximum employer premium for 2016 is therefore $1337.06.


The Canada Pension Plan contribution rate for 2016 is unchanged at 4.95% of pensionable earnings for the year.


Dollar amounts on which individual non-refundable federal tax credits for 2016 are based, and the actual tax credit claimable, are contained herein.


The indexing factor for federal tax credits and brackets for 2016 is 1.3%. Contained herein are the federal tax rates and brackets will be in effect for individuals for the 2016 tax year.